6 Resume Mistakes To Stop Making Today

October 20, 2020 Christina O'Handley

resume-mistakes

If you’re searching for a new job, you know how important it is to write a great resume. It’s the first impression a hiring manager will have of you, so you’ll need to make it count.

Although you may be a qualified candidate, you may be unknowingly making resume mistakes that can get you rejected from a role. To make sure you have a top-notch resume that will land you an interview, avoid these six resume mistakes.

Being vague throughout your resume

To write a resume that stands out, you’ll need to do more than simply list out your daily tasks. Employers want to interview candidates they know can be successful in the role. They won’t know if you’re qualified if you aren’t specific with what you’ve done. That’s why it’s so important to write a detailed resume that showcases your particular skillset. Not only will it paint a better picture of your skills to the hiring manager, but it can also make you resume more memorable.

Not listing out your accomplishments at work

One of the biggest resume mistakes job seekers make is forgetting to include their accomplishments. Compared to simply telling the hiring manager what your previous responsibilities were, sharing your accomplishments shows the value you can offer the company. Being able to share your successes will make you more credible to the hiring manager and help you get through to the next stage of the hiring process.

Using Passive Tense Throughout Your Resume

The way you write your resume may make all the difference when applying to roles. That’s why you need to use action verbs over a passive tense throughout your resume. For example, avoid writing something like, “Revenue increased while working on digital campaigns” and instead write “Increased revenue by 10% through digital campaigns.” This will make you seem more assertive and accomplished throughout your entire resume.

Including irrelevant information

Most hiring managers will only skim through your resume before they decide if you’re a good fit. To make sure they only read the relevant parts of your resume, take out the outdated information that may not be applicable to the role. For example, if you’ve been working for 10 years, don’t include your college activities on your resume. Including this type of information will only take up space that you could be using to showcase why you’re a fit for the role.

Writing a generalized resume

It may take up less time on your end to only write a generalized resume, but you may not land any interviews with it. You don’t necessarily need to redo your entire resume for each role you apply to. However, it is beneficial to tweak your resume based on the job description. To save time, take a look at the roles you’ve applied for. Do they fall into different categories? If so, create different resumes that align with the different categories of roles you’re interested in to keep yourself more organized.

Not running a spellcheck

Attention to detail is essential for most jobs out there. If you have multiple grammatical and spelling errors, your resume will land in the trash folder right away. Take the time to look through your resume to make sure everything is spelled correctly and written properly. This only takes a few minutes and can make all the difference when you apply to roles.

 

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