How Professionals Can Drive Their Own Career Growth

July 14, 2021 Stephanie Klemperer

career-growth

As you think about career growth, it can be easy to focus on that next promotion or training opportunity you’d like to receive. While these short-term goals can certainly help you gain new skills, make a greater impact, and boost your overall happiness at work, it’s just as important to think about the bigger picture.

While your employer should be making the effort to help you grow professionally, ultimately, it is you who is responsible for your career success. If you want to keep your skills up-to-date, be eligible for advancement opportunities, and maintain your professional marketability in today’s ever-evolving market, you need to take the reins on your career growth. When things can change at the drop of a dime—from the skills in-demand to market conditions—being proactive, both at work and in your personal time, will help you stay resilient and bring you closer to achieving your long-term professional goals.

Here are seven ways to take charge of your own career growth:

Set learning goals

Setting your learning goals is a critical first step to being more proactive about your career growth. Get started by thinking about where you want to be in the next three to five years. Is there a specific level you want to be at? Are you looking to make a leap into a new industry or career path? Regardless of the answer, thinking about the big picture can help you set more manageable goals that keep you accountable for learning. These should be mini and ever-evolving goals, like learning a new skill or earning a certification.

Make learning part of your work week

When focused on your specific role and responsibilities, it can be difficult to make the time for learning. While a common frustration, this situation can unfortunately hinder your career growth. To take a more proactive approach, try to block out a set amount of time each week to spend on training and courses. Even if it’s just an hour on Fridays, for example, this time can make a huge difference in the long run.

Utilize company resources

Many companies have formal programs or policies to help employees with professional development. However, it is also your responsibility to express interest in these opportunities. If you are serious about career growth, discuss your learning and development goals with your supervisor. Together, you can come up with an action plan based on the resources available.

Ask for stretch assignments or shadowing opportunities

There are many opportunities to learn and grow on the job, even if you have been with your employer for some time. If your career growth has stagnated or your days feel repetitive, consider asking for a stretch assignment or shadowing opportunity. Access to a new project or the ability to explore a different area of the company can help you feel more challenged and learn something new.

Look outside the office

You can find plenty of opportunities for career growth outside of the office as well. Seek out networking events to attend and industry associations to join. You can also take online courses, earn certifications, read blogs, and become a volunteer to supplement what you are learning on the job. Read also: Want More Career Development? Look Outside The Office

Apply what you’re learning

Keep your finger on the pulse of new industry skills, technologies, and strategies, and try to utilize this expanded knowledge at work. Share what you’ve learned with your manager and team to help identify skills gaps, discover opportunities for process improvements, and brainstorm new ideas. Doing this will allow you to put what you’ve learned into practice, while helping your team better accomplish their goals.

Find a mentor

Seek out a mentor with a career path you’d like to emulate. Based on their experiences, they can offer you the support, feedback, and advice you need to keep growing in your career. You’ll be able to learn from their successes and mistakes, and they may even be able to connect you with new opportunities for professional development, networking, and career advancement. Read also: 4 Reasons Why You Need A Professional Mentor

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